Eastgate

Description

Use the open/close headers to view different sections of the Character Area Statement. for the area you are in. A full copy of the statement can be downlaoded from the 'Documents'  section of each Character Area.

  • Overview
    Eastgate Character Area is a residential area located immediately outside of the former east gate of the upper Roman and Medieval city. The area has a complex townscape influenced by the full spectrum of the city’s evolution since its foundation in the Roman Military Period.
     
    The area has a loose grid pattern of Roman and Medieval streets that converge on the former east gate of the Roman and Medieval cities. The funnelling of streets reflects the shape of a former High Medieval market in the area. Roads are well connected to the east and west carrying high volumes of vehicular and pedestrian traffic, retaining its historic status as one of the main entrances to the city. However, there is poor connectivity to the south and north as result of the strong boundary formed by the High Medieval Close Wall and plots of large-scale houses respectively.
     
    There is an observable pattern in the townscape from east to west. Properties increase in age towards the west, and this is accompanied by the more frequent use of stone and other ‘traditional’ materials. There is a relative increase in building scale, and smaller and mostly individual build units lead to complex and varied building lines. Buildings are also set at the back of the footway. The east-to-west pattern creates a sense of arrival when entering the city, which is heightened by the terminating view of the cathedral towers and the converging of streets onto the former east gate.
     
    Properties throughout have doors and windows facing out onto the street, creating a feeling of activity and security along the street, although tall walls lead to a high sense of enclosure and feeling of insecurity in parts.
     
    Several buildings survive from the Early Modern Era, mainly in the west of the area. However, there are a handful of similar buildings and features in the east, which help to develop more of a transition between western and eastern parts of the Character Area.
     
    Eastern and central parts of the area are dominated by Late Victorian/Edwardian houses which mostly consist of small rows of terraced houses as well as a small number of semi-detached and detached houses. The properties introduce a greater regularity of scale and form, and style, leading to a finer grain of buildings and plots, and a more regular townscape character.
     
    Buildings dating to the Post-War and Modern Periods are mostly located in the far east of the area and are comparably more varied in form, although within build units properties are highly coherent. Properties are often constructed of modern materials and incorporate features that try to imitate earlier ‘traditional’ features. The buildings have a strong emphasis on the incorporation of car parking into developments with properties blanked off at first-floor level or built around cul-de-sacs or courtyards. This often leads to inactive frontages in many parts of the area.
     
    A considerable amount of public realm survives from the Late Victorian/Edwardian Period and earlier, complementing the medieval pattern of streets and building plots in the area.
  • Historical Development
    Eastgate Character Area lies on the eastern side of Lincoln’s historic city centre, north east of the ecclesiastical core of the upper city. Alongside many features surviving from Lincoln’s Roman history, the townscape of the area includes many elements associated with the city’s growth and re-organisation during the High Medieval Era [850-1350 AD].
     
    Upper parts of the northern escarpment have had a defensive role since the founding of Lincoln during the Roman Military Era [60-90 AD], when a Roman legionary fortress was constructed. The remains of the Roman Colonia Era east gate to the former defensive enclosure survive immediately west of the Character Area on the north side of Eastgate. Langworthgate and Greetwellgate, which converge from the east to form Eastgate, are all likely to date from the Roman period, and would have been important in establishing Lincoln as a market and administrative centre during the Roman and subsequent Medieval periods.
     
    During the Early Medieval Era [410-850 AD] the city underwent a period of decline, and settlement probably retracted almost entirely within the former Roman defences. Lincoln experienced a comparably more prosperous period during the High Medieval Era, during which time much of the city was re-organised and re-built, including the city’s walled defences. Growth and re-organisation of the townscape led to the creation of new roads, including the routes of Winnowsty Lane, St. Leonard’s Lane, and the length of Wragby Road forming the east of the Character Area. St. Leonard’s Lane formed the eastern boundary to St. Leonard’s Church, which was built as part of the city’s expansion. The initial St. Peter’s church was built during the same period, and the surviving 18th-century church on Eastgate occupies the former plot of the church (although the original plot probably extended further to the north). During the High Medieval and Early Modern [1350-1750 AD] Eras, the former Roman roads of Eastgate, Greetwellgate and Langworthgate are likely to have formed a wide funnel-shaped market, the shape of which survives in the current townscape. As part of the re-organisation of the city during the High Medieval Era, a new ecclesiastical core centred on the Cathedral, developed immediately south west of the Character Area. Towards the end of the High Medieval Era, the religious area was enclosed by the ‘Close Wall’ in order to protect the clergy moving between their homes and the Cathedral at night. The wall, considerable lengths of which survive, forms much of the southern boundary of the Character Area running from the southern boundary of 29 Eastgate to the defensive tower on Winnowsty Lane.
     
    During the High Medieval and Early Modern Eras, the Character Area is likely to have been established as a genteel suburb, most probably due to its proximity to the religious elite within the Close as well as its location adjacent to the upper city centre. Two boundary markers on Eastgate, the southern one of which survives from the Early Industrial Period [1750-1845 AD] if not before, define the boundary of the historic city core known as the Bail. Many of the standing buildings in the Character Area survive from the Early Modern Era, particularly in the west of the area, such as 1 Greetwellgate, 17 Eastgate, and 3 Priorygate. Many buildings in the area have complex structures, having undergone several phases of redevelopment, such as the amalgamated pair of cottages at 20 Eastgate, and 23 Eastgate with its stone-built southern gable end and re-fronted brick façade. Furthermore, several buildings in the area, such as the house and former hotel of D’Isney Place, have changed in use over time. The stone-built boundary walls either side of the Bull and Chain Public House also illustrate the complexity of the townscape, most clearly to the east, where the former ground-floor doorway and windows of a stone house have been filled in to make the boundary wall. The ground floors of several houses along Eastgate are lower than the road surface itself, illustrating the sustained use and redevelopment of the road and therefore its continued importance as an eastern gateway to the city.
     Stone-built boundary walls to the east of the Bull and Chain Public House incorporating the remains of the ground floor of a stone house
    Figure 1 Stone-built boundary walls to the east of the Bull and Chain Public House incorporating the remains of the ground floor of a stone house
     
    During the High Medieval and Early Modern Periods the suburb was located on the eastern fringes of the upper city, bordering open space with the city’s East Common Field. At some point during the Early Modern Period, land within the area is likely to have become enclosed, probably through a series of piecemeal agreements and exchanges between residents of Lincoln with common rights to farm the field. Unenclosed parts of East Field were later enclosed by an Act of Parliament in 1803, which stipulated the enclosure of many of Lincoln’s open fields. Field boundaries most probably associated with the piecemeal enclosure of land survive in the current townscape, such as in the orientation of St. Giles Avenue, the eastern boundary of Lincoln Lawn Tennis and Bowls Club, and the northern plot boundary of 27 Wragby Road. The complex and irregular pattern of housing plots in the west along Greetwellgate, Eastgate and Langworthgate also derives from the piecemeal division of land over an extended period of time. Several large plots have been subdivided by later development, notably during the 19th century; however, two large plots on the west of the area to the rear of 25/27 Eastgate and D’Isney Place survive from the Early Industrial period, if not before. The lack of infill development may in part be a result of the strong boundary of the Close Wall to the south.
     
    The area may have been a focus for small-scale open limestone quarrying, probably in the form of localised areas of ‘digging’ mostly in the High Medieval and Early Modern Eras. The use of stone in the construction of many properties and walls in the area is illustrative of the availability of local stone, much of which may have come from quarries within the area. The Cloisters development in the east of the area also incorporates a former quarry dating to the Early Modern Era, if not earlier.
     
    From the Early Industrial Period, as well as subsequent periods, Lincoln’s population increased dramatically, requiring the provision of services and public buildings, as well as residential housing. Much of the early housing, which was in the form of small rows of dwellings, was cleared during the Post-War Period [1946-1966 AD], to make way for new houses or for car parking, such as the area immediately north of the Morning Star Public House. As a result, properties surviving from his period of expansion date from the Late Victorian/Edwardian Period [1869-1919 AD], and include housing for workers (e.g. 8-32 Langworthgate, 1-18 Winnowsty Lane and 43 to 49 Greetwell Gate) as well a number of middle class residences (e.g. Number 1-19 St. Giles Avenue, Winnowsty House and 27-29 Wragby Road). Properties were constructed on remaining open land, including the former market area between Greetwellgate and Langworthgate. As part of the city’s expansion, services were also built in the area, including Eastgate Church of England Primary School on the site of St. Leonard’s Church.
     
    Development during the Inter-War [1920-1945 AD], Post-War [1946-1966 AD] and Modern [1967 –2009 AD] Periods mostly entailed the clearance and development of existing plots, such as the development at 25-33 Langworthgate on the former site of Early Industrial cottages. Towards the end of the Modern Period development has become increasingly larger in scale, such as the complex of apartments at the corner of Greetwellgate and Wragby Road, as well as the Cloisters development to the south.
  • Urban form
    Eastgate Character Area is located at the summit of the north escarpment immediately east of the historic eastern gateway to the upper city. The majority of the area is composed of residential properties dating from the Early Modern Era to the Modern day, resulting in a complex townscape that has been strongly influenced by the full spectrum of the city’s evolution since its foundation in the Roman Military Period.
     
    The suburb is arranged around a loose grid pattern of streets which converge on the former east gate of the Roman and Medieval cities, immediately west of the area. To the east and west, roads are well connected to the main Wragby and Nettleham radial roads taking traffic in and out of the north of the city. Consequently Eastgate, which connects the roads, carries high volumes of vehicular and pedestrian traffic, retaining its historic status as one of the main entrances in and out of the historic city. However, from within the Character Area, connectivity to the south and north is poor as result of the strong boundary formed by the High Medieval Close Wall and the impenetrable plots of large-scale houses respectively. As a result, the Character Area is largely made up of small-to-medium urban blocks; however, the edges of the area either border, or are within, larger urban blocks which extend outside of the area itself.
     Two and three storey buildings along Eastgate built using stone and redbrick.
    Figure 2 Strong building lines along Eastgate
     
    A key characteristic of the area, which illustrates its staged evolution until the Inter-War Period, is the increasing age of properties towards the west of the area on approaching the historic city centre. The west/east chronology introduces a sense of arrival when entering the city, which is reinforced by the terminating view of the cathedral towers and the converging of streets onto the former east gate. The wide road funnels towards the city centre, assuming a shape typical of other markets in the city such as Newport to the west. The east-to-west pattern is accompanied by several changes in the townscape, most notably an increasing use of stone and other ‘traditional’ materials in building construction, smaller and mostly individual build units leading to a more complex and varied building line, an increase in building scale from two to three storeys (with the exception of Modern buildings), and the more forward setting of buildings at the back of the footway. Properties are built in large plots and often occupy the full width of plots with their longest façade facing the road, resulting in a strong building line of attached buildings. In contrast, the majority of houses to the east of Eastgate (with the exception of some Modern buildings and a handful of detached buildings) are often part of larger build units of up to 23 properties (e.g. Wainwell Mews), are smaller in scale and are built of brick. Houses are set in smaller rectangular plots with their shorter sides facing the road, leading to a more repetitive pattern of building façades and a higher overall building density. Properties in the east of the area mostly have small 2-3m deep forecourts, reducing the sense of enclosure and giving a more suburban feeling. There are a handful of buildings and features, e.g. Eastgate Church of England Primary School boundary wall, 1 and 2 St. Leonard’s Lane, and 27 Wragby Road, which are more akin in character to properties in the west of the area. These houses help to develop more of a transition between western and eastern parts of the Character Area, drawing out some of the characteristics of properties typical of the west of the area into the east. Civic or public buildings within both areas are set back more deeply within plots, such as St. Peter in Eastgate Church and Eastgate Church of England Primary School.
     Number 2 St. Leonard's Lane, which is built from stone with a garage attached. Before the drive is an area in the path with setts in it.
    Figure 3 Number 2 St. Leonard's Lane which, alongside other elements, draws out some of the characteristics of properties typical of the west of the area into the east
     
    Properties throughout the area have doors and windows facing out onto the street, creating a feeling of activity and security along streets. However, tall walls along many sections of streets, most notably the Close Wall along Winnowsty Lane, lead to a high sense of enclosure and feeling of insecurity in places. Strong building lines, coupled with the tall boundary walls, and buildings set close to or at the back of the footway lead to a high sense of enclosure and an urban feeling in many parts.
     
    Buildings along Eastgate, as well as 1 and 2 St. Leonard’s Lane, are two to three storeys in height and up to seven/eight bays in width. Properties are generally plain in style, with some large-scale stone decoration on some buildings such as the neo-classical porch and Venetian windows on 18 Eastgate, and ashlar quoins on D’Isney Place. Projections are few, and include a handful of oriel windows at first-floor level (e.g. 19, 22 and 23 Eastgate) as well as a few porches (e.g. 18 Eastgate and D’Isney Place). Windows are almost entirely vertical multi-paned wooden sliding sash windows, except for some small openings on industrial buildings around the Cathedral workshops. Window lintels have simple and generally plain stone lintels or segmental brick arches, the keystones of which are occasionally emphasised in stone. Roofs are commonly of pantile, Welsh slate or plain tile, with plain eaves and verges. With the exception of the single-storey industrial buildings within the Cathedral workshops, all buildings along Eastgate have the ridgelines running parallel to the road. Roofs often have one or a pair of dormer windows set either wholly within the roofspace or at eaves level. The dormers often have small wooden multi-paned casement windows.
     Numbers 17 and 18 Eastgate with use of stone in their construction/decoration
    Figure 4 Numbers 17 and 18 Eastgate with use of stone in their construction/decoration
     
    Late Victorian/Edwardian houses in the area mostly consist of small rows of terraced houses (e.g. 8 to 32 Langworthgate, and 1-11 Winnowsty Lane), as well as a small number of semi-detached and detached houses at the eastern end of Langworthgate and along St. Giles Avenue. Houses are generally two storeys in height and two bays in width, with some larger properties extending to three bays in width and two and a half storeys in height. Build units, which range in size from one to ten houses, are usually identifiable by coherences in the built form and decorative style of houses, (e.g. harling on 1-6 St. Giles Avenue). Properties are built of red brick, and are relatively plain in style with simple brick decoration in the form of dentilation in the eaves and stringcourses in a beige or blue brick. Several features such as the porch on the Bull and Chain Public House, bay windows and the pediment on the gable end of 34 Greetwellgate are loosely classical in style. A small number of detached properties along Wragby Road are more ornate, possibly emphasising their more prominent location facing the main road, such as 27 Wragby Road with its moulded entranceway, and the Gothic-style building at the corner of Wragby Road and Langworthgate. As well as being a corner building the latter property forms a terminating building along Wragby Road. The house carries the name ‘Wolds View’ on a plaque at first-floor level, emphasising its easterly prospects.
     
    Buildings set back from the footway have one- or two-storey canted bay windows (e.g. 1-11 Winnowsty Lane), The bays are mostly constructed of wood and are loosely classical in style. The majority of windows are vertical sliding sashes, although a handful of properties of Late Victorian/Edwardian date have horizontal casement windows. Window lintels are mostly simple carved stone blocks or segmental brick arches, and sills are mainly thin stone blocks. Doors are located within sunken porches, at the back of the footway, or within shared alleyways. Many doors have been replaced with uPVC substitutes, although some wooden panelled ones survive or have been replaced ‘like for like’. Recessed porches, a number of which along St. Giles Avenue are shared, often have semi-circular carved stone lintels, such as the properties along Winnowsty Lane, many of which are ornate.
     St. Giles Avenue. Gabled ends on Late Victorian/Edwardian properties with bay windows on the ground floor.
    Figure 5 St. Giles Avenue. Gabled ends on Late Victorian/Edwardian properties
     
    Roofs on Late Victorian/Edwardian houses run parallel to the street and are generally shallow in pitch. The majority of roofs are of Welsh slate, although several have been re-roofed with concrete tile. Dormer windows are infrequent, although a number of properties have gabled ends above windows or on shallow projecting wings (e.g. St. Giles Avenue).
     
    Eastgate Church of England Primary School is located towards the centre of the area, and consists of two school buildings set back within a large plot surrounded by playgrounds and car parking. The buildings are built of brick with stone dressings in the windows and on a number of decorative features such as buttresses and kneelers in the verges. Windows are steel-framed and multi-paned, and are very tall on the building in the south. The school’s plot is formed by a waist-high stone wall, which echoes materials within buildings in the west of the area. Both buildings have steeply gabled roofs of Welsh slate.
     
    St. Peter in Eastgate Church is a subtle, but landmark building in the Character Area. The church was built in the Late Victorian/Edwardian Period in the Early English and Early Decorated styles. The building is constructed of coursed square stone and rockfaced ashlar, with Westmorland slate roofs. Set back within a deep plot, the façade of the church is partially obscured by mature trees which bring a more suburban character to the area.
     Mature trees and open space around St. Peter in Eastgate Church.
    Figure 6 Mature trees and open space around St. Peter in Eastgate Church
     
    Buildings dating to the Post-War and Modern Periods are comparably more varied in form, although within build units properties are highly coherent. Properties within the Wainwell Mews development are similar in scale to surrounding terraces, being two bays in width and two storeys in height. The properties are arranged in short stepped rows of three or four houses, fronting onto Greetwellgate or within the small cul-de-sac of Wainwell Mews itself. The houses are plain in character with simple brick stringcourses, shallow single-pitch hanging porches and dentilated brickwork in the eaves. The houses have vertical single and two-light windows with dark brown frames.
     Houses within the Cloisters development backing onto Wragby Road. These Modern buildings are constructed of materials that try to imitate characteristics of earlier buildings.
    Figure 7 Houses within the Cloisters development backing onto Wragby Road. Modern buildings are often constructed of materials that try to imitate characteristics of earlier buildings
     
    Houses within the Cloisters development immediately to the east are larger in scale, being two and a half storeys in height and two bays in width, and are built within large rows of houses. The properties face into a central courtyard accessible off Greetwellgate, and back onto Wragby Road, leading to a strong and tall building line along the road, which, due to the lack of doors is relatively inactive compared to the remainder of the area. Houses are extremely plain with decoration limited to brick dentilation in the verges and two-storey bay windows with swept fibreglass roofs. Window lintels consist of a plain brick soldier course, and sills are made of synthetic stone. Windows are square in emphasis and are uPVC imitation sash windows which open as a horizontal casement. Roofs are of synthetic slate and have large oversized dormer windows at eaves level, with the same imitation sash windows as on the ground and first floors.
     
    44 Greetwellgate is the largest building in the area, being nine bays in width and four and a half storeys in height. The apartment block faces the junction of Greetwellgate, Greetwell Road and Wragby Road. The ground floor of the building is mostly car parking, leading to very inactive frontages along both Wragby Road and Greetwellgate. The building is steel framed with brick walls and is very plain in style with limited decoration. The ground-floor level is rendered in an imitation coursed stone/stucco, and parts of the front façade and the upper storey are covered with steel panels and imitation slate respectively. Windows are square/vertical steel-framed casement windows, and in some areas larger feature windows and door-sized openings. The building is served by a single pedestrian entrance and a large car park entrance with security mesh, both of which lead to a high sense of inactivity and a low sense of security in the vicinity.
     Number 44 Greetwellgate is modern building with inactive ground floor due to internal car parking.
    Figure 8 Number 44 Greetwellgate with inactive ground floor due to internal car parking
     
    The Close Wall forms much of the southern boundary of the Character Area, and is a conspicuous linear feature along the east/west stretch of Winnowsty Lane, forming a strong and impermeable linear boundary. The tall walls, which include the remains of a bastion at their eastern end, are constructed of stone rubble with two courses of pantile at the top. At approximately three metres in height the walls dramatically increase the sense of enclosure, and define Eastgate Character Area as an extra-mural suburb.
     Strong stone walled impermeable boundary along Winnowsty Lane
    Figure 9 Strong impermeable boundary along Winnowsty Lane
     
    Roads in the Character Area are mostly a narrow two lanes in width, with narrow 1m wide pavements, although Winnowsty Lane is a single lane in width. Roads and pavements are surfaced in tarmac, except along Eastgate, the pavements of which are surfaced with concrete slabs. However, a considerable amount of public realm survives from the Late Victorian/Edwardian period and earlier, such as white limestone and red granite crossovers, York Stone channels, kerbs and dished surface drains. The retention of traditional elements of public realm throughout the area complements the Medieval pattern of streets and building plots in the area.
     
    Open space in the area is limited, and includes the Lincoln Lawn Tennis and Bowls Club in the north of the area and the car park in the centre of the area. Much of the remaining open space in the Character Area is taken up by private gardens, many of which are large in the west of the area.
  • Views
    There are narrow confined views along many streets leading to more open views along the eastern boundary of the area. Views along streets towards the city centre are frequently crowned with the Cathedral, emphasising the area’s location adjacent to the city and its ecclesiastical core. Views from the east end of Eastgate funnel towards its junction with Northgate, leading to a sense of arrival at the city centre.
     Funnelling view west along Eastgate. Showing different styles of property.
    Figure 10 Funnelling view west along Eastgate
  • Condition of Buildings and Streetscape
    Buildings are well maintained and in good condition throughout the area. Several buildings, predominantly to the east of the area have had rainwater goods and doors and windows replaced with uPVC/plastic substitutes.
     
    Although pavements and roads are surfaced with modern materials, there is a high retention of traditional elements of public realm throughout the area.
  • Use
    The area is almost entirely residential, with a small number of local services including the Bull and Chain and Morning Star public houses, the Eastgate Church of England Primary School, and the Lincoln Lawn Tennis and Bowls Club.
  • Relationship to City and Surrounding Areas
    The area is a busy corridor for traffic entering and leaving the east of the upper city. Furthermore, the area is delineated by strong boundaries to the north and south, emphasising the east/west movement through the area.
     
    The area’s maturing character from east to west, which takes on an increasingly urban form, remains a prominent historic gateway to the upper city.
  • Key Townscape Characteristics
    Ÿ          Residential area located immediately outside of the former east gate of the upper Roman and Medieval city
    Ÿ          Complex townscape influenced by the full spectrum of the city’s evolution since its foundation in the Roman Military period:
    o         Loose grid pattern of Roman and Medieval streets which converge on the former east gate of the Roman and Medieval cities
    o         Funnel shaped Eastgate reflecting shape of former market
    o         Surviving sections of the Close Wall
    o         Buildings dating to the Early Modern Era
    o         Alignment of early field boundaries in streets and plots
    o         Remains of a quarry in the Cloisters development
    Ÿ          Well connected to main roads to the east and west, carrying high volumes of vehicular and pedestrian traffic, retaining its historic status as one of the main entrances to the city
    Ÿ          Poor connectivity to the south and north as result of the strong boundary formed by the High Medieval Close Wall and plots of large-scale houses respectively
    Ÿ          Increasing age of properties towards the west of the area on approaching the historic city centre. Observable pattern from east to west:
    o         Increasing use of stone and other ‘traditional’ materials
    o         Smaller and mostly individual build units leading to complex and varied building line
    o         Increase in building scale
    o         Forward setting of buildings at the back of the footway
    Ÿ          Sense of arrival when entering the city created by the terminating view of the cathedral towers and the converging of streets onto the former east gate
    Ÿ          Properties throughout have doors and windows facing out onto the street, creating a feeling of activity and security along streets. Tall walls lead to a high sense of enclosure and feeling of insecurity in parts
    Ÿ          Strong building lines, coupled with the tall boundary walls, and buildings set close to or at the back of the footway lead to a high sense of enclosure and an urban feeling in many parts
    Ÿ          Buildings along Eastgate, as well as 1 and 2 St. Leonard’s Lane:
    o         Occupy the full width of large plots with their longest façade facing the road, resulting in a strong building line. Two to three storeys in height and up to seven/eight bays in width
    o         Plain in style, with some large-scale stone decoration
    o         Projections are few, and include oriel windows and porches
    o         Vertical multi-paned wooden sliding sash windows
    o         Simple and generally plain stone or brick window lintels
    o         Pantile, Welsh slate or plain tile roofs, with plain eaves and verges
    o         Ridgelines running parallel to the road with one or a pair of dormer windows
    Ÿ          There are a handful of buildings and features (e.g. Eastgate Church of England Primary School boundary wall), which are more akin in character to properties in the west of the area. These houses help to develop more of a transition between western and eastern parts of the Character Area, drawing out some of the characteristics of properties near the centre into the west
    Ÿ          Late Victorian/Edwardian houses in the area mostly consist of small rows of terraced houses as well as a small number of semi-detached and detached houses
    o         Two storeys in height and two bays in width
    o         Coherent within build units of one to ten houses
    o         Built in small rectangular plots with shorter sides facing the road
    o         Small 2-3m deep forecourts, reducing the sense of enclosure and giving a more suburban feeling
    o         Properties are built of red brick, and are relatively plain in style with some stone elements
    o         Some loosely classical style features
    o         Detached properties along Wragby Road are more ornate
    o         Vertical sliding sash windows
    o         Mostly set back from the footway
    o         One or two storey canted bay windows
    o         Doors to front often with porch
    o         Shallow gabled Welsh slate roofs with ridgelines parallel to the street
    Ÿ          Two key public buildings of Late Victorian/Edwardian date include Eastgate Church of England Primary School and St. Peter in Eastgate Church, which are set back deeper within plots
    Ÿ          Buildings dating to the Post-War and Modern Periods are comparably more varied in form, although within build units properties are highly coherent
    o         An apartment block and terraced houses ranging from two to four and a half storeys
    o         Houses are built in rows, often backing onto the road facing a courtyard or cul-de-sac
    o         Extremely plain in character
    o         Constructed of modern materials and features that try to imitate earlier ‘traditional’ features
    o         Strong emphasis on car parking incorporated into developments with properties blanked off at first-floor level or built around cul-de-sacs or courtyards
    Ÿ          The Close Wall is a conspicuous linear feature forming a strong and impermeable linear boundary. The tall walls are constructed of stone rubble with two courses of pantile at the top. At approximately three metres in height the walls dramatically increase the sense of enclosure, and define Eastgate Character Area as an extra-mural suburb
    Ÿ          Considerable amount of public realm survives from the Late Victorian/Edwardian period and earlier, complementing the Medieval pattern of streets and building plots in the area
    Ÿ          Open space in the area is limited, and mostly includes private gardens and a sports club